Cancers, Vol. 15, Pages 840: Mixed Acinar Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Pancreas: Comparative Population-Based Epidemiology of a Rare and Fatal Malignancy in The United States

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Cancers, Vol. 15, Pages 840: Mixed Acinar Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Pancreas: Comparative Population-Based Epidemiology of a Rare and Fatal Malignancy in The United States

Cancers doi: 10.3390/cancers15030840

Authors: Amro M. Abdelrahman Jun Yin Roberto Alva-Ruiz Jennifer A. Yonkus Jennifer L. Leiting Isaac T. Lynch Alessandro Fogliati Nellie A. Campbell Danielle M. Carlson Lewis R. Roberts Gregory J. Gores Rory L. Smoot Rondell P. Graham Thorvardur R. Halfdanarson Mark J. Truty

Mixed acinar neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas (MANEC-P) is an extremely rare malignancy with a poor prognosis. However, epidemiological estimates of MANEC-P remain unknown. This study aimed to estimate and compare the incidence, prevalence, and cancer-specific survival (CSS) of MANEC-P in the United States (US). Patients with MANEC-P were identified through the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and National Program of Cancer Registries databases between 2000–2017. The primary outcomes included age-adjusted incidence rate, limited-duration prevalence, and CSS. A total of 630 patients were identified for the incidence analysis and 149 for the prevalence and CSS analyses. The MANEC-P incidence rate was 0.011 per 100,000 individuals, which was the lowest among pancreatic cancer histologic subtypes. The incidence rate was significantly higher in men and Black races and peaked at 75–79 years of age. The incidence rate was the lowest in the midwestern region (0.009) and the highest in the northeastern US (0.013). The 17-year prevalence was 0.00005%, indicating that 189 patients were alive in the United States at the beginning of 2018. The median CSS of MANEC-P was estimated to be 41 (23, 69) months. In conclusion, MANEC-P is very rare, and its incidence rate has been steady in the US over the last two decades. MANEC-P has a poor prognosis and is the 5th leading cause of pancreatic cancer-related death in the US.

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