JCM, Vol. 12, Pages 1061: Comparison of Contributors to Mortality Differences in SLE Patients with Different Initial Disease Activity: A Larger Multicenter Cohort Study

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JCM, Vol. 12, Pages 1061: Comparison of Contributors to Mortality Differences in SLE Patients with Different Initial Disease Activity: A Larger Multicenter Cohort Study

Journal of Clinical Medicine doi: 10.3390/jcm12031061

Authors: Ziyi Jin Zheng Chen Wenyou Pan Lin Liu Min Wu Huaixia Hu Xiang Ding Hua Wei Yaohong Zou Xian Qian Meimei Wang Jian Wu Juan Tao Jun Tan Zhanyun Da Miaojia Zhang Jing Li Xuebing Feng Lingyun Sun

To explore the etiology of risk factors and quantify the mortality differences in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with different initial disease activity. The Jiangsu Lupus database was established by collecting medical records from first-hospitalized SLE patients during 1999–2009 from 26 centers in Jiangsu province, China, and their survival status every five years. The initial SLEDAI scores [high (>12) vs. low–moderate (≤12)] differences in mortality attributable to risk factors were quantified using population attributable fraction (PAF), relative attributable risk (RAR) and adjusted relative risk (ARR). Among 2446 SLE patients, 83 and 176 deaths were observed in the low–moderate and high activity groups, with mortality rates of 7.7 and 14.0 per 1000 person years, respectively. Anemia was the leading contributor to mortality, with PAFs of 40.4 and 37.5 in the low–moderate and high activity groups, respectively, and explained 23.2% of the mortality differences with an ARR of 1.66 between the two groups. Cardiopulmonary involvement caused the highest PAFs in the low–moderate (20.5%) and high activity (13.6%) groups, explaining 18.3% of the mortality differences. The combination of anemia and cardiopulmonary involvement had the highest RAR, causing 39.8% of the mortality differences (ARR = 1.52) between the two groups. In addition, hypoalbuminemia and a decrease in the creatinine clearance rate accounted for 20–30% of deaths and explained 10–20% of the mortality differences between the two groups, while antimalarial drug nonuse accounted for about 35% of deaths and explained 3.6% of the mortality differences. Anemia, cardiopulmonary involvement and hypoalbuminemia may cause substantial mortality differences across disease activity states, suggesting additional strategies beyond disease activity assessment to monitor SLE outcomes.

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