JCM, Vol. 13, Pages 3070: Standardized Solutions of Catecholamines in Intensive Care Medicine: Application, Safety and Economic Aspects

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JCM, Vol. 13, Pages 3070: Standardized Solutions of Catecholamines in Intensive Care Medicine: Application, Safety and Economic Aspects

Journal of Clinical Medicine doi: 10.3390/jcm13113070

Authors: Armin Niklas Flinspach André Mohr Jahn Wehrle Kai Zacharowski Vanessa Neef Florian Jürgen Raimann

Background/Objectives: Catecholamines are among those agents that are indispensable in modern intensive care medicine. The rapid availability of hygienically impeccable and correctly concentrated injectable solutions, e.g., for syringe pumps, is becoming more and more important. However, little research has been conducted regarding how the use of catecholamines is distributed in different wards and what options can be used to achieve optimal availability. Methods: In a retrospective monocentric study from 2019 to 2022, all continuously applied catecholamines in intensive care units (ICU) and intermediate care units (IMC) were investigated. The focus was on potential optimization by utilizing manufactured ready-to-administer solutions in the context of the economization of patient care. Results: Norepinephrine syringes represented 81% of all syringes administered, appearing to be the most frequently used on all wards. Production by the in-house pharmacy showed both financial advantages and an increase in patient safety compared to syringes produced at the bedside. Discussion: Increasing numbers of critically ill patients coupled with growing staff shortages and an increased awareness of safety requirements are driving the move towards ready-to-use and ready-to-administer solutions in critical care medicine. In-house manufacturing by hospital pharmacies can be a promising option to optimize processes and improve the economics of patient care. Conclusions: Individual calculations of the required catecholamine preparations with regard to possible economic advantages should be carried out in hospitals. In particular, in-house production of ready-to-use and ready-to-administer preparations could significantly increase patient safety and seems to be economically viable.

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