Microorganisms, Vol. 12, Pages 1059: Isolation and Characterization of a Low-Temperature, Cellulose-Degrading Microbial Consortium from Northeastern China

3 weeks ago 9

Microorganisms, Vol. 12, Pages 1059: Isolation and Characterization of a Low-Temperature, Cellulose-Degrading Microbial Consortium from Northeastern China

Microorganisms doi: 10.3390/microorganisms12061059

Authors: Jiaoyang Ji Maia Escobar Shijia Cui Wei Zhang Changjie Bao Xuhan Su Gang Wang Sitong Zhang Huan Chen Guang Chen

The lack of efficient ways to dispose of lignocellulosic agricultural residues is a serious environmental issue. Low temperatures greatly impact the ability of organisms to degrade these wastes and convert them into nutrients. Here, we report the isolation and genomic characterization of a microbial consortium capable of degrading corn straw at low temperatures. The microorganisms isolated showed fast cellulose-degrading capabilities, as confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and the weight loss in corn straw. Bacteria in the consortium behaved as three diverse and functionally distinct populations, while fungi behaved as a single population in both diversity and functions overtime. The bacterial genus Pseudomonas and the fungal genus Thermoascus had prominent roles in the microbial consortium, showing significant lignocellulose waste-degrading functions. Bacteria and fungi present in the consortium contained high relative abundance of genes for membrane components, with amino acid breakdown and carbohydrate degradation being the most important metabolic pathways for bacteria, while fungi contained more genes involved in energy use, carbohydrate degradation, lipid and fatty acid decomposition, and biosynthesis.

Read Entire Article