Vaccines, Vol. 12, Pages 662: COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance, Hesitancy, and Uptake in People with Diabetes in Australia

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Vaccines, Vol. 12, Pages 662: COVID-19 Vaccine Acceptance, Hesitancy, and Uptake in People with Diabetes in Australia

Vaccines doi: 10.3390/vaccines12060662

Authors: Holly Wang Lisa Grech Jennifer Wong David Hoffman Barbora de Courten Brett Sillars Mark Savage Alastair Kwok Mike Nguyen Nathan Bain Daphne Day Eva Segelov on behalf of the DIABVACCS Investigators on behalf of the DIABVACCS Investigators

Background: This study explored vaccination hesitancy, diabetes-specific COVID-19 vaccination concerns, and whether they predicted vaccination uptake in people with diabetes. Methods: Quantitative, cross-sectional, and predictive approaches were used. An online survey was conducted with people with diabetes attending four Australian health services, using convenience sampling (n = 842). The survey data collected included clinico-demographic characteristics, COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, and attitudes around COVID-19 vaccine confidence and complacency. Clinico-demographic characteristics that predicted vaccination status, vaccine hesitancy, and vaccine-related attitudes were identified using regression analyses. Results: Most participants received at least one COVID-19 vaccine dose. Younger age and type 1 diabetes were associated with lower vaccination status, and they were partially mediated through higher vaccine hesitancy. Younger age and English as a dominant language were associated with higher negative attitudes towards speed of vaccine development. Conclusions: Despite an overall high vaccination rate, general and diabetes-specific COVID-19 vaccine concerns are a barrier to uptake for some people with diabetes, particularly in those who are younger or have type 1 diabetes. A detailed understanding of concerns for particular subgroups can help tailor information to increase vaccine acceptance, particularly in the context of requiring booster doses.

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